Hollywood Movies – Why Some Fail at the Box Office

For decades Hollywood has been making movies of different genres. One such genre is sex and violence. But do these movies do really well at the box office or are they really appreciated by people around the globe? Well some admire them while the majority discards them if they fail to relate with the characters.

Hot and sensuous contents are part of the Hollywood movies which pulls the crowd to the theaters. Characters make a sizzling entry during a scene which tunes a person’s mood and takes them to a different world. But scenes like these do not make the Hollywood movies to break box office records.

Of course, we do get tempted by such sizzling scenes so do our children. Movies should be based on strong script, a good story lineup and a unique form of screenplay. These are the elements that make the movies to reach the stardom.

Though there are certain movies that had such disturbing scenes, yet they have managed to break the box office jinx and won numerous awards. It is because the people have liked them.

Titanic, The Graduate, The Reader and many more such movies that bagged Oscar, Golden Globe and the BAFTA awards and became the people’s choice. Whereas movies like “Basic Instinct”, “Species”, “Cool Surface” and many more such movies that contained such adulterous scenes failed miserably at the box office. These movies really run out from the story and showcase much on the intimate scenes which needs parental advice when watched at home.

Movies are meant to entertain viewers and should manage to pull a huge number a crowd to the theater. But, contains like this fail miserably at the box office which drives the movies out from the theaters within a week. Movies should be made for everyone including the kids, but adulterous scenes are triggered by the letter “A” which excludes children from getting into the theaters.

We all know about such movies, but it is better to make a romantic movie such as “Gone with the Wind” and “Titanic” than to make movie that have intimate scenes. Sometimes such movies tend to show certain unexpected scenes which might disturb our sentiments.

Before the release of an adult movie, the censor board takes a thorough checking on such movies and passes it with an “A” grade. The movies hit the theater and with the alphabet printed on the poster, people come to know about the quality and it’s contain. This is why censor board plays a crucial role while approving any kind of the movie before its release.

Though editors play a crucial role in editing contains of the movie, yet censor board plays its role to give out the final approval before the release. The censorship panel takes a firm look of the movie and the juries decide over the scenes, which part must be deleted and which one should be in the movie.

Though censor board enacts its role while editing certain scenes, still movie makers like to make such bold movies that contain certain disturbing scenes. Maybe certain groups of people enjoy such movies but majority of them consider it to be a time killing performance.

The Future of Hollywood, Movies, and Entertainment

When’s the last time you went to the theater? I am referring not to the movie theaters, which themselves are experiencing dwindling ticket sales, but to a theater with a stage?

They do exist, though they are mainly frequented by two types of audience members. The first are the traditionalists, the connoisseurs, people who appreciate theater as a unique art form. These people tend to be middle to upper class, middle age to elderly, and may or may not bring their families with them, if they have families. These people often see the same productions over and over, usually by different theater companies. They may be particular fans of Shakespeare or Frederico Garcia Lorca, and usually these patrons have a long history of going to the theater that often began when their parents took them as children.

The second type of theater patron would be those who are members of the theater community. They are actors and directors and writers and stage hands, and their families and friends. These people are often theater majors in college, and may or may not be making a meager living in the community. They show up for their brethren’s shows, as much to support each other and for camaraderie as for appreciation for the art itself.

With the exception of spectacular musical theater shows, which consistently draw larger crowds than non musical theater, there is a very small market for stage productions. What money there is to be made is rarely enough to grow rich on. But this essay is not about live theater. It is about movies and television. The screen. Specifically I am considering the future of movies, which I believe is swiftly going the way of traditional theater; contracting, becoming a niche, and falling out of the main stream.

Yes, I foresee the era of big budget films ending, and Hollywood ceasing to exist as a grand centralized location for the film and television industry. Soon. What will we supplant these forms of media with? Video games. Posh you say. That could never happen. Video games are cartoonish and pedestrian, not a true art form like film. But what happens when a video game becomes more real than film? Virtual reality role playing scenarios may one day be able to mimic all of our senses and fool the keenest of participants into confusing them with reality. Whatever reality is.

In this hypothetical VR, we are active participants, not passive observers. Artificial intelligence will adjust itself to accommodate our individual desires, decisions, creations and interactions. In the future, perhaps, we will all be writers, directors, and actors in our own epic improvised adventure journeys. This technology, should it come to fruition, will render obsolete film as the medium of choice for our entertainment needs. But the question is, what will happen to the writers, directors, and actors?

For the answer to that, I take as an example a local theater called Improv West, at which I have taken in a few live shows. While I was in the audience, I paid attention to who was sitting around me, and gleaned that most of the people there to watch were also performers, students of the improv school, or family and friends of performers and students. Few of the people there were not involved in the comedic improvisation community in some capacity.

Film, I believe, will be much the same way not to long from now. It will still be a valued medium by few but not a massive industry as it is today. It will be valued not by the general public, but by die hard aficionados, people who are in it for passion for the art form. They will be accompanied by their family and friends, who themselves may not be film makers, but who get a thrill out of seeing the work of someone they are close to. Niche genres like sci fi and horror may still be valued by certain audiences, as will cult films that posses unique cinematic qualities. But the era of big budget actioners, romantic comedies, and dramas with big name actors will probably wane.

So where does that leave Hollywood? I live in Hollywood, and I work in the film industry, so I am very aware of how many people rely on it as their means of paying the bills. No matter which way I look at it, I foresee Hollywood contracting, perhaps slowly at first, but eventually giving out completely. It is going to become more competitive for jobs as more people eschew giving up an hour or two of their time to watch film and television, in favor of chatting with friends online or making movies of their own using inexpensive high definition camcorders to upload to YouTube.

It should be noted that spectacle is always going to have it’s place. This is why I think musical theater is still such a strong art form that can still sell large amounts of tickets. Humans always want to see crazy spectacular performances live, for the same reason cult films will always be in vogue, and street performers will always gather crowds on busy streets. We just like crazy shit. The only problem in fact is that there isn’t enough spectacular groundbreaking films and stage performances to saturate the market and keep dvd sales and ticket sales up. It takes an enormous amount of creative output and some luck to come up with something that is just outrageous enough to captivate audiences for generations and not be forgotten among the stacks of okay and semi-decent formula movies. A perfect example of this would be Blade Runner, a spectacular film of cult status that has been unmatched by any of Ridley Scott’s many directorial efforts since despite his efforts.

Eventually, even video games may not need writers. Artificial intelligences may be able to adapt to our unique wants and needs in real time, making each journey into simulated realities unique and new. Certainly there will be many movies and films and stage productions between now and this hypothetical future that experience success, but all of the evidence indicates that things are moving towards the general public becoming not consumers of artistic media but creators themselves. So if you’re in Hollywood and have big dreams, I suggest you make your millions and become famous as soon as possible, because in the future, we are all celebrities.

The History of Hollywood Movie Awards

The modern movie was born in 1915 with the release of D.W. Griffith’s silent epic “Birth of a Nation,” and the first Hollywood movie awards followed little more than a decade later.

Eager to head off the potential threat of disruption cause by increasing unionization within the industry, Louis B. Mayer of the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio founded the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) in May 1927. The organization aimed to promote harmony and solidarity among the five major divisions of the film production process: directors, producers, actors, writers, and technicians.

Two years later, in an effort to further promote unity, the Academy announced the launch of a series of awards for cinematic excellence. The very first Academy Awards ceremony took place on the evening of May 16, 1929, and was attended by around 270 guests.

Every film played at any theater in Los Angeles between Aug. 1, 1927 and Aug. 1, 1928 was eligible for nomination with one exception. The first ever feature-length motion picture to include synchronized dialogue, “The Jazz Singer,” was disqualified from the Outstanding Picture category on the grounds that its pioneering use of sound gave it an unfair advantage against all of the silent movies that were in contention.

Although “The Jazz Singer” still received nominations for the categories of best Adapted Screenplay and Engineering Effects, it won neither. In consolation, a special honorary award for the film was presented to Darryl Zanuck, head of production at Warner Brothers, for having “revolutionized the industry.”

Although they were hugely successful at the time, these first-ever award winning movies are now little remembered and studied only by students of film history. The awards for Best Production and Engineering Effects were both won by “Wings,” a silent film about fighter pilots in World War I, while the romantic drama “Seventh Heaven” won in three categories, including Best Director.

This first event was chiefly focused on the actual presentations, as the names of the winners had all been announced roughly three months earlier. It also featured the sole appearance of a separate award for the best director of a comedy film, won by Lewis Milestone for “Two Arabian Knights.”

The iconic statuette was designed by founder Academy member and MGM art director Cedric Gibbons and has changed little since it first made its debut at the first ceremony. No one quite knows how the statuette earned the “Oscar” nickname, but it is most often attributed to actress Bette Davis who is said to have named the figure after her husband.

The gold-plated statuettes stands 34 cm tall, weighs 3.85 kg, and depicts a medieval knight holding a broadsword and standing on a five-spoke film reel, where each spoke represents one of the five filmmaking disciplines.

The second Academy Awards in 1930 marked the first time the recipients were announced on the actual night of the ceremony. An arrangement was made to release the names of the winners to the newspapers earlier in the day on the understanding that they would not publish them before 11 p.m.

The Best Picture winner of 1930-31, “Cimarron,” was the only Western film to win the top prize until “Dances with Wolves” seized it some sixty years later. In 1934, Frank Capra’s “It Happened One Night” became the first film to make a clean sweep of the five most sought-after categories: Picture, Director, Actor, Actress, and Screenplay. Forty years had passed before any other film achieved the same feat.

One of the most remarkable years in the early history of film awards was 1939; this is due to the fact that the competition for Best Picture included several movies that, unlike the early silent movies, have gone on to stand the test of time and continued to receive widespread acclaim.

That year the John Wayne vehicle “Stagecoach” was vying for Best Picture with the Howard Hawks’ screwball comedy “His Girl Friday,” the ground-breaking “The Wizard of Oz,” and the hugely popular “Gone with the Wind.” More remarkable still is that, despite such stellar competition, “Gone with the Wind” managed to sweep the board with a total of eight Oscar wins.

For the first few years, awards related to all the work a particular actor or director had done was completed during the qualifying period. It was only in 1933 that the system was changed to honor specific works instead. Another major change came in 1935 when the qualifying period was altered to represent the previous calendar year rather than a period spanning two years.

In 1940, the Los Angeles Times busted the long-standing embargo and revealed the names of that year’s winners in its evening edition. Ever since, the Academy has made use of the now famous system of sealed envelopes, keeping everyone in suspense until the very last minute.

Top 20 All-Time Hollywood Movies

Every year there are new blockbuster movies and potential classics that audiences can enjoy for generations to come. If you are looking for a list of great movies – arguably the best movies Hollywood has ever made, then start with this list of 20 best movies as your guide.

The American Film Institute and other critically respected organizations update their “Best” lists every year. Though the rankings may change, and there are occasionally new entries toward the top, here are the consistently ranked top Hollywood movies.

20 – To Kill A Mockingbird. Gregory Peck give an unforgettable performance in this adaptation of Harper Lee’s classic novel. His search for justice has inspired and influence courtroom dramas every since.

19 – E.T. No other film captured the imagination of young audiences in the 1980’s than E.T. This extra-terrestrial teamed up with Drew Barrymore to form the best chemistry between child and alien that the big screen has ever seen.

18 – Alien. Director Ridley Scott’s best film to date. Spawning multiple sequels that never lived up to the quality of this break-out film. A must-see for any sci-fi fan.

17 – Rear Window. How many of Hitchcock’s films usually make “best-of” lists? We could easily put five of them up here. But James Stewart’s performance is unbelievable.

16 – Unforgiven. This movie handed Clint Eastwood an Oscar for Best Picture and remains a classic revenge tale.

15 – Pulp Fiction. A more recent addition to the American Film Classic library. This put Quentin Tarrantino on the map and inspired a generation of screenwriters.

14 – King Kong. A classic, and innovative at the time for this use of stop motion animation in the much-copied Empire Stat Building climax.

13 – 12 Angry Men. Another courtroom drama for the ages. Shot almost entirely in a jury deliberation room, this movie proves a play can be adapted effectively for the screen.

12 – Annie Hall. A comedy classic that won Woody Allen a Best Director award from the Academy, even though he did not show up to accept. This movie became a template for off-beat romantic comedies that still works today.

11 – Rocky. If the Rocky series had ended after the first movie, this would still be a sports classic. This humble love story about a fighter who finally gets his shot never gets old.

10 – Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. A breakthrough in animation on the scale of Pixar’s achievements, and even greater considering the lack of technology. This movie is still beautiful.

9 – Casablanca. The story of a love-torn man during World War Two. Proof that the lives of two people can have a great impact on the entire world.

8 – Chinatown. Roman Polanski’s epic film about a private eye played by a young Jack Nicholson who gets in over his head.

7 – North By Northwest. Another Hitchcock movie that stands the test of time. A caper that unfolds when the wrong man is targeted.

6 – Wizard of Oz. An epic that every family can watch and enjoy together no matter how young or old.

5 – Schindler’s List. Steven Spielberg’s classic story of how one man saved so many from the horrors of the concentration camps.

4 – Titanic. James Cameron’s epic story of love caught in the middle of a world famous disaster.

3 – Gone With the Wind. One of the most famous adaptations. This Civil War drama remains a staple of best Hollywood movies lists.

2 – Citizen Kane. Orson Welles’ story of a fallen titan broke the rules of story and directing.

1 – The Godfather. The end all be all of gangster films. Francis Ford Coppola’s classic is the story of a mafia family that still feels fresh today.

Use this list of 20 best movies to become acquainted with film history and the various films in every genre that have stood the test of time.