Writing Screen Play Scenes and Novel Chapters for Big Hollywood Movies

Are you considering writing a screen play or a novel that you want to turn into a screen play or perhaps be ready in case Hollywood calls one day? If so you are in luck, that is if you are using the new Microsoft Word 2007, because you can download a formatted template for your next screen play and then simply write into that word template and then when you are done convert it all into a .PDF file and presto you have a screen play successfully written and ready to distribute.

Well first you have to write it of course and writing a scene for a screen play or a conversation for one of the chapters of your novel with two people conversing is not as hard as you might think. They are indeed very similar tasks. If you are writing a novel which will be converted into a Movie for the big screen then you probably wish to have four to six scenes per chapter.

Some novelists who are writing only for the movies will work hard to get it down to two or three scenes per chapter, short fast suspenseful chapters. When writing a screen play you have probably seen a paragraph at the top of a screen play chapter that says “Scene Opens Up with” and a description of the some sort of visual imagery depicted in words.

For a writer who likes to write novels or books, even if they are only eBooks of fiction writing a screen play, at least one makes a lot of sense, because it is excellent practice and it helps you mentally prepare and be ready to write a novel that can later be turned into a movie quite easily, so consider doing one simply as an exercise, and it may later very much help your career as a writer?

Psychological Complexes in Hollywood Movies

There are a pair of movies that spring to mind when I think of this particular subject. One was incredibly successful and the other pretty much disappeared without a trace. It hadn’t really occurred to me why one would do so much better than the other, especially since both had stellar casts, but I may now have an idea why.

The first of the two movies was released in 1991 and starred Billy Murray and Richard Dreyfuss. In “What About Bob” Murray played a multiphobic person who had difficulty leaving his house for any other reason than to visit his psychiatrist. When the doctor has to go on vacation, Bob goes into a bit of a tizzy and ends up stalking the good doctor and his family at their vacation spot. It’s there that the craziness ensues, with the family far more accepting of Bob than the doctor, which isn’t that difficult given how egotistical the Dreyfuss character is.

The biggest problem here was that the psychological issues that Bob suffered from were somewhat glossed over for the sake of the comedy. The complex issues of the main character were painted like a caricature and made so big as to be totally ridiculous. You never really felt that he was under any real personal stress, which I guess no-one wants to see in a light comedy of this sort. The movie did make money, but I believe that’s simply because of the popularity of Bill Murray at the time rather than any great love for the flick in general.

The other movie that I think of when it comes to psychological disorders is the 1998 Jack Nicholson movie “As Good As It Gets.” Ironically, the character that Nicholson plays in the movie has many of the same issues that Bob has in the aforementioned Bill Murray film. The difference here is that Nicholson’s problems are given a very “real” treatment. His character is very difficult to like from the get go, but you end up pulling for him because you can see that it’s his psychological issues that are affecting all of his relationships. So unlikeable is his character, you are surprised when a neighbor’s dog take to him so quickly. Of course, we find out later that he was stuffing bacon treats in his pocket so that the dog would come to him.

The scenes in the movie that show the problems of the character are subtle, yet it’s still very apparent how big of an impact they have on his life, as well as the lives of everyone he comes into contact with. You can see and feel that he wants to change, but that doing so isn’t going to be easy. Yes, his problems are played up for laughs, but you also get a bit of an insight into the life of a person suffering from these sorts of psychological issues. You see the pain he is creating, as well as his inability to stop it happening. Maybe I’m looking at all this a little too deeply, and it’s just as simple as people liking one movie over another, but I think the reason that “As Good As It Gets” scored big at the Academy Awards is because it was able to successfully mix the psychological madness into the comedy.

Top Hollywood Movies of 2012: Genre Hopping Fun!

With the new year quickly approaching, it might be interesting to focus on a summation of the best Hollywood movies of 2012. This past year saw some outstanding and innovative films spanning across some unusual genres. Les Miserables, starring Anne Hathaway, is a musical adaption of a Victor Hugo novel while science fiction intrigues like Looper, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, delighted and stimulated audiences earlier this year. Although the Academy Awards are a few months away, critics are talking oscar buzz with these films and some others exciting films, some of which will be chronicled shortly.

Les Miserables

Victor Hugo’s novel of the same name came to artistic fruition in 1862. Today it is hailed as on the best slice of life novels of all-time and perhaps one of the best overall novels of the nineteenth century. Transliterated as “The Wretched,” the novel (and film) focuses on the tough lives of peasants following the 1832 June Rebellion. Nonetheless, the film itself is a musical drama disseminated by Universal Pictures and starring big names like Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, and Anne Hathaway. In terms of critical reception, Peter Travers for Rolling Stone Magazine raves that Les Miserables is a musical feast for the eyes and ears and has ample humor and pathos to keep the whole family entertained.

Looper

In the same vein as a Ridley Scott science fiction flick or a Arthur C. Clarke novel, Looper gives us a futuristic story about time travel. The film takes place in the year 2074 and its premise is thus: assassins, known as loopers, are sent back into the past (present) to take out dangerous people. For instance, a criminal organization might decide that a neo-Hitler is simply too hostile and corrosive, and subsequently call for his assignation before his tumultuous rise to power. The film’s chief twist, though, is that the criminal organization in question, unbeknownst to them, has called for a hit of the assassin. The movie invokes time travel problems like the grandfather paradox and is expertly acted by both Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis; the latter plays the older version of the same character. You can’t miss this science fiction gem!

The Master

Hailed by some critics as the revival of Joaquin Phoenix’s waning career, The Master is actually a much more nuanced piece of art. Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman costar in a film with many themes: disassociation, disillusionment, betrayal, love, and loyalty all coalesce. The film revolves around the dislocated troubles of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s character who helms a philosophical movement known as the “cause” in the film. Loosely based on the real-life scientology epidemic, which actually follows the same timeline as the partly fictitious “cause” in The Master, the film chronicles how people respond to power, desperation, and loyalty. Already, the film has generated best supporting actor Oscar buzz for a revived Phoenix. The story can’t be missed.

Summing Up

This article has made a compendium of the top hollywood movies 2012, spanning many genres and ideas. From science fiction to drama, this year in movies proved both eclectic and riveting for audiences everywhere!

Big Hollywood Movie Gross Sales and the Publicity of Tragedy Considered

Perhaps you recall back in the summer of 2012 there was a terrible shooting at the premiere opening night of the new Batman movie in Colorado. A gunman walked into the theater and started opening fire wounding over 50 people and killing 12. The media labeled it the worst shooting in US history by a single gunman. The amount of psychological damage not to mention the physical carnage will not easily be forgotten. Interestingly enough, that Batman movie grossed over $161 million in the first weekend. Okay so let’s talk about this for second shall we?

Did the terrible events trigger a massive media blitz helping that big Hollywood movie make more money? Although it was a big budgeted movie, and expected to do extremely well, I believe the tragic event and media coverage actually did help the movie make more money. This causes a dilemma with what we as Americans think is right. It’s not that we don’t want Hollywood to make money on their movies, we want the industry to succeed so they can keep bringing us even better movies in the future.

Unfortunately such a tragic event was rewarded at the box office due to the media coverage which transpired. In many regards anti-violent movie advocates would say that we need less violence in movies to prevent future tragedies, but in this case the tragedy became a symbiotic relationship with the amount of revenue earned by the industry. That’s a problem, and is something we now have to deal with. The movie reviews were good, and since it was such a high-revenue grossing movie there will also be actors and actresses win awards for their performances.

Will Hollywood be able to vote for their best-of-breed actors and actresses who performed in that movie in good faith? Will the Academy Awards consider the implication of pouring salt in the wounds of the victims by giving this movie “Best Picture” or awarding actors and actresses with best actor or best supporting role? That’s a tough call isn’t it?

Interestingly enough, the movie producers were hesitant on releasing the results for that first weekend because the movie grossed so much money, at a time when the country was in morning, and the President of the United States had actually declared the flags to be lowered for nearly a week to allow the country to heal and reflect on what had happened. Indeed I hope you will please consider all this on a philosophical and psychological level, and think on it